TYPES OF LIENS THAT CAN BE PLACED ON YOUR INJURY CASE

Attorney Tyson Mutrux describes in this video types of liens that can be placed on your injury case

Hi, Tyson Mutrux with the Mutrux Law Firm. Today I wanna talk about the types of liens that can be placed on your personal injury case. I’m just gonna briefly discuss what they are. I can go to in-depth detail of each type of lien in separate videos.

So the main ones you’re gonna see in a personal injury case, the main ones are Provider liens, and that means that doctors have given you treatment and they placed a lien on the settlement, so they make sure they get paid out on the settlement amount. The other kind might be an ERISA lien, Veterans Affair lien, Medicare, Medicaid. An ERISA lien is one where you have insurance and your employer pays for that insurance, so they were gonna be reimbursed for what they paid towards your medical bills.

Then you also have things that aren’t so common like Social Security Disability liens, and another one that is often overlooked is Child Support liens, if you were a father or a mother of a child and you owe child support. The state of Missouri or the state of Illinois can actually go after you and put a lien on your personal injury case which can sometimes make it difficult to settle at the end of the case if we don’t know about it. So make sure you let your attorney know about it. We go to detail about these liens in other videos.

If you have any other questions, go to website, look us up on YouTube. Bring any questions if you call 888-550-4026 or email me at tyson@mutruxlaw.com . Thanks a lot. Thanks for watching. Appreciate it.

 

Disclaimers:

**The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements.**

**Past results do not serve as a guarantee of future results.**

**The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.**