WHAT YOU SHOULD DO IMMEDIATELY AFTER SLIPPING AND FALLING AT A GROCERY STORE OR OTHER ESTABLISHMENTS

Attorney Tyson Mutrux describes in this video what you should do immediately after slipping and falling at a grocery store or other establishments.

Tyson Mutrux: Hi, Tyson Mutrux with the Mutrux Law Firm. Today I’m discussing what you should do immediately after slipping and falling at a grocery store or other establishment. The number one thing, the first thing you need to do is identify what you slipped or tripped on. You want to take photographs of that right away. If it’s water in an aisle, you want to take photographs of that.

The next thing you want to do is you want to contact an employee or a store manager, preferably a store manager, and get any names of anyone that is actually working at that time because that’s very important for later on down the case if the case goes to trial. The next thing you want to do is you want to, any witnesses that were may be in the aisle that may have seen you fall to show that you fell on that specific substance or cause the fall because of that specific substance. And the last thing is you want to get the treatment you need right away. If you were injured that day, go get treatment that day because you don’t want to be accused of later on down the road, well, they were just faking it, contact an attorney and they were told to go get treatment then. So those are things you should do immediately after falling in an establishment.

If you have any other questions about that, give us a call at 888-550-4026 or check us out at MutruxLaw.com. Thanks for watching. Have a great day.

 

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